WEEKLY SPECIALS | SEASONAL CALENDAR | GROWER MAP

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Two Main Varieties of Persimmons

Hachiyas and Fuyus are the two main commercial varieties of persimmons in the United States and are eaten very differently.  Hachiyas are tapered and shaped like an acorn. If you accidentally tried a piece of Hachiya before it was completely jelly soft, the astringency and bitterness would leave a fuzzy taste in your mouth. Hachiyas need to be fully ripened until they are almost translucent and EXTREMELY soft. If you think any part of the fruit is still firm you need to wait. Cut a ripe Hachiya in half and scoop out the delicious fruit or use the pulp in cakes, muffins or our favorite, the James Beard Persimmon Bread!

Fuyu’s are short, squat and non-astrigent and when ripe they have a sweet flavor with a hint of cinnamon and apricot.   You can eat them raw when they are firm or soft and they do not need to be peeled.  Fuyu’s can be eaten like an apple, cut up and eaten on their own or great in a salad.

Fuyu persimmon (1)

Honeynut Squash

The cute stout Honeynut squash is about 6″ tall and looks just like a mini butternut squash. The outside has a deep honey color and the flesh has an intense sweet flavor that becomes almost caramel like when roasted. You won’t want to add maple syrup or brown sugar to this naturally sweet variety. The skin is similar to the delicata squash and does not need to be peeled, and they have three times the amount of beta-carotene!  The Honeynut is grown for its flavor, rather than yield, and personal serving size.  Roast at 425° for 20-30 minutes until tender. If you feel like getting a little fancier try this savory recipe for Honeynut Squash with Radicchio and Miso!

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/honeynut-squash-with-radicchio-and-miso

 

Kiwi Berries

If you like Kiwi’s then you will fall in love with the Kiwi Berry. Kiwi Berries taste exactly like a Kiwi but they are the size of a grape, fuzzless and completely edible.  Cut one in half and the inside flesh looks just like a Kiwi. This no mess snack is fun to eat and perfect for the whole family. Learn more about the delicious Kiwi Berries.

How to eat – Just pop them in your mouth!

Califoria Keitt Mangos

Fragrant California Keitt mangos from Coachella Valley in Southern California are one of Earl’s employee’s favorite mangos.  They are super juicy and sweet with almost no stringy fibers and a smaller pit than other mangos which means more flesh to eat. Don’t shy away from these green mangos because Keitts stay green even when ripe.

The Second Crop of Figs is the Sweetest

Maywood Farms organic figs are grown in Corning, about 2 hours northwest of Sacramento. Figs love the heat and are always picked ripe. Varieties include Kadota, Adriatic, Brown Turkey and Black Mission. 

Top Tips for Choosing Corn

Top tips for choosing the best ear of corn without peeling back the husk! Feel for plump kernels through the husk. Look for brown and sticky tassels sticking out of the top of the ear. Black or dry tassels mean the corn is old. A bright green husk is a sign of fresh corn. Dwelley Farms corn from Brentwood . Grown less than 2 hours from San Francisco!

Sun Valley Raspberries

Sun Valley Farm Organic Raspberries are an Earl’s exclusive! Now peaking on gorgeous high color tasty fruit locally grown in the Pajaro Valley. Rogelio Jr, Stephen and Rogelio Sr. Ponce have been farming in the Pajaro Valley for three generations with a focus on berries. The Ponce family is both skilled in growing multiple varieties and types of berries but they also have a seasoned and honed eye toward quality. The Ponce family now manages their own independent family farm. Sun Valley Farms specializes in growing high quality non-proprietary raspberries and strawberries along with broccoli, baby broccoli, chards, kales, white, purple and orange cauliflower, parsley and cilantro. They hire permanent, year-round labor, excel at crop planning and management and take huge pride in what they do and it shows in everything they grow!

Stone Fruit Season Has Begun!

Peach and nectarine season has begun!  Generally speaking we start seeing peaches around May 1st and the season can continue into September. We can look forward to the many varieties changing about every 1 to 2 weeks. The only difference between peaches and nectarines is that peaches are covered in a light fuzz.

California Cherries

California cherries season has started. The fruit is sweet with a beautiful deep red color. California has a combination of nutrient-rich soil, abundant sunshine and mild temperatures, producing sweet fruit. We expect the California season to be shorter than usual due to the heavy rains we had this spring so don’t miss out!

Cherries resized twitter design

Rhubarb

Beautiful red stalks of rhubarb have arrived at Earl’s signaling the beginning of spring. Often thought of as a fruit, rhubarb is actually a vegetable.

How to buy
Look for bright red stalks which have a sweet rich flavor. The size of the stalk is not an indicator of tenderness!

Fun Fact

Rhubarb is 95% water and high in potassium and vitamin c.

Storage and Cooking
Wrap loosely in plastic and store in the coldest part of your refrigerator. Do not keep for more than a few days or it will start to dry out. Place the stalks in cold water for about an hour to refresh them before cooking.

Rhubarb is very tart and acidic and will make your mouth pucker up if you eat it out of hand. Just add honey or sugar to transform it into a delicious dessert or savory dish. We like pairing rhubarb with strawberries in a pie or making a compote to top yogurt or vanilla ice cream. My favorite recipe is a refreshing rhubarb shake topped with chopped pistachios.

Rhubarb Shake

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