WEEKLY SPECIALS | SEASONAL CALENDAR | GROWER MAP

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Califoria Keitt Mangos

Fragrant California Keitt mangos from Coachella Valley in Southern California are one of Earl’s employee’s favorite mangos.  They are super juicy and sweet with almost no stringy fibers and a smaller pit than other mangos which means more flesh to eat. Don’t shy away from these green mangos because Keitts stay green even when ripe.

Fragrant Galia Melons

Galia melons are a hybrid melon developed in Israel with a yellow-green flesh. They are a cross between a cantaloupe and a honeydew. You can tell when it’s ripe by the Galia’s intense fragrance. Choose melons with a golden-green color.  They are rich in potassium which is essential for proper hydration. Perfect for summertime!

California Juicy Stone Fruit Season

Peach and nectarine season has begun!  Generally speaking we start seeing peaches around May 1st and the season can continue into September. We can look forward to the many varieties changing about every 1 to 2 weeks. The only difference between peaches and nectarines is that peaches are covered in a light fuzz.

 

Rhubarb

Beautiful red stalks of rhubarb have arrived at Earl’s signaling the beginning of spring. Often thought of as a fruit, rhubarb is actually a vegetable.

How to buy
Look for bright red stalks which have a sweet rich flavor. The size of the stalk is not an indicator of tenderness!

Fun Fact

Rhubarb is 95% water and high in potassium and vitamin c.

Storage and Cooking
Wrap loosely in plastic and store in the coldest part of your refrigerator. Do not keep for more than a few days or it will start to dry out. Place the stalks in cold water for about an hour to refresh them before cooking.

Rhubarb is very tart and acidic and will make your mouth pucker up if you eat it out of hand. Just add honey or sugar to transform it into a delicious dessert or savory dish. We like pairing rhubarb with strawberries in a pie or making a compote to top yogurt or vanilla ice cream. Our favorite recipe is a refreshing rhubarb shake topped with chopped pistachios.

Rhubarb Shake

California Asparagus

The height of the asparagus season in California runs from March to June.  California asparagus is mainly grown at the confluence of California’s two greatest rivers, the Sacramento and the San Joaquin, in the rich peat of the delta lands an hour south of Sacramento and in the Salinas Valley about 2 hours south of San Francisco. California produces over 70 percent of the nation’s fresh market asparagus. Don’t miss Coastal View Produce Asparagus grown in Gonzales in the Salinas Valley, exclusively available through Earl’s Organic!

Shaved asparagus makes a delicious topping for pizza!
Shaved asparagus makes a delicious topping for pizza!

When you’re ready to eat them, snap or cut off the white portion of the butt end of the asparagus. They’re perfect coated with olive oil and roasted, which leaves them firmer, nuttier and sweeter than steaming.  Asparagus is high vitamin C and K and folic acid and contain less than 50 calories per 6 oz serving.  Click here for more recipes.

Gold Nuggets

Gold Nugget Mandarins have bumpy skin, are very aromatic and are easy to peel. Fruit is seedless with a rich and sweet flavor. Season starts in San Diego County,overlaps and finishes in the foothills of Fresno County.

Gold Nugget Variety of slices

Moro Blood Oranges

Moro Blood Oranges grown in the Central San Joaquin Valley are just a few of the wonderful types of citrus in season.  The red flesh of the Blood Orange varies in intensity depending on the variety, location where the trees are grown and the degree of fruit maturity. Brought to America in the 1930’s by Italian and Spanish immigrants they are now grown commercially in Southern California, Texas and Florida. Hot days and cold nights are needed to bring out the best flavors in blood oranges.

Blood orange rounds and slices

Satsuma Mandarins

Satsumas have a loose peel that slips off effortlessly like a glove, with no mess and no seeds to deal with.  Satsumas are a perfect snack size that you can eat anywhere without the difficult peeling and complication that comes with eating a valencia or navel orange.

Health Benefits:

A 2008 U.S. Department of Agriculture study said Satsumas have six to seven times as much synephrine, a natural decongestant, as other citrus. Four or five Satsumas have enough synephrine to equal the effect of a Sudafed tablet, the study said. Satsumas are also naturally low in calories and a single fruit contains 34 percent of the USDA daily recommendation for vitamin C.

Buying Satsumas:

Look for fruit with an aromatic smell, firm tight peel, no dented spots and a heavier fruit means they are juicier. They can be stored at room temperature or in the refrigerator, but not for too long because prolonged storage can dry them out.

Two Main Varieties of Persimmons

Hachiyas and Fuyus are the two main commercial varieties of persimmons in the United States and are eaten very differently.  Hachiyas are tapered and shaped like an acorn. If you accidentally tried a piece of Hachiya before it was completely jelly soft, the astringency and bitterness would leave a fuzzy taste in your mouth. Hachiyas need to be fully ripened until they are almost translucent and EXTREMELY soft. If you think any part of the fruit is still firm you need to wait. Cut a ripe Hachiya in half and scoop out the delicious fruit or use the pulp in cakes, muffins or our favorite, the James Beard Persimmon Bread!

Fuyu’s are short, squat and non-astringent and when ripe they have a sweet flavor with a hint of cinnamon and apricot.   You can eat them raw when they are firm or soft and they do not need to be peeled.  Fuyu’s can be eaten like an apple, cut up and eaten on their own or great in a salad.

Fuyu persimmon (1)

Honeynut Squash

The cute stout Honeynut squash is about 6″ tall and looks just like a mini butternut squash. The outside has a deep honey color and the flesh has an intense sweet flavor that becomes almost caramel like when roasted. You won’t want to add maple syrup or brown sugar to this naturally sweet variety. The skin is similar to the delicata squash and does not need to be peeled, and they have three times the amount of beta-carotene!  The Honeynut is grown for its flavor, rather than yield, and personal serving size.  Roast at 425° for 20-30 minutes until tender. If you feel like getting a little fancier try this savory recipe for Honeynut Squash with Radicchio and Miso!

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/honeynut-squash-with-radicchio-and-miso

 

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