WEEKLY SPECIALS | SEASONAL CALENDAR | GROWER MAP

twitter24x24square facebook24x24square youtube24x24square pinterest24x24square instagram24x24square

Pluot, Plum or Apricot?

Pluots look very similar to a plum but they are actually a hybrid of about 75% plum and 25% apricot or it could be 60% plum and 40% apricot. It is difficult to discern the exact percentage because of all the complex crossbreeding between hybrids. One thing for sure is that the Pluot is more plum than apricot. Floyd Zaiger, the father of over 200 stone fruit varieties, developed the Pluot from the Plumcot, developed by Luther Burbank. To learn more about the genetic history of the Pluot click here.

Pluots have a sweet rich plum flavor married with the savory flavor and dense flesh of an apricot. Pluots are mostly grown in the San Joaquin Valley where the winter time temperatures are not too cold and the summer time is hot and dry. Pluots come in many colors from green, shades of purple, pink to red and can be solid, mottled, dappled or spotted.  They often have a white or silvery colored “coating” on them. This is a natural, waxy, protective coating produced by the fruit.

The first variety of Pluot to land at Earl’s is the deep plum colored Flavorosa.  A first bite into this early pluot is tangy followed a sweetness that floods your mouth. As the season continues other varieties will arrive including Flavor King, Flavor Queen, Flavor Supreme and the ever popular Dapple Dandy, also known as the “dinosaur egg”.

Always make sure to wash your fruit before eating it. Look for pluots that are smooth-skinned, plump and firm. They will ripen on your counter and you can refrigerate them for up to 3 days.

Flavor Rosa Pluot

Flavor Rosa Pluot

Search
Follow us ...

twitter24x24square facebook24x24square youtube24x24square pinterest24x24square instagram24x24square