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Archive for October, 2018

Mushroom Prices on the Rise

Beginning November 1st all of our mushroom growers are raising prices with more changes expected by the end of the year.  

There are three main reasons for the increase in prices. First, poorer batches of compost are producing reduced actual yields which means lower pounds per square foot.  Second, there is a lack of harvesters as the labor pool turns over.  As the term ends for temporary foreign workers they must return to their home countries and new replacements have to be government approved. Third, with legalized cannabis a whole new industry has emerged and is pulling farm based ag labor away from mainstay growers/shippers.

Please ask your Earls’ Sales rep for more information.

Brown Mushrooms

 

 

Earl’s Organic Buyer’s Notes October 28th

October Fair Trade Month is almost over but Earl’s Organic Fair Trade offerings continue! Check out Earl’s full line of Fair Trade offerings on list today.

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Covilli THE BITE October 2018

Earl’s will receive their first land of Covilli Organic Fair Trade product this Friday! Look for Persian cucumbers, Anaheim, Cherry Bomb, Jalapeno, Padron and Serrano Chiles, Yellow Squash and Zucchini. Let the season commence!  Each month we will share Covilli’s newsletter “THE BITE”, A Taste of Covilli Happenings.  Catch the latest news below.

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Earl’s Organic Produce Buyer’s Notes October 21st

Tutti Frutti Heirloom Tomatoes are starting to come out of the last hoop houses with fare supplies and increasing prices over the next 10-14 days. Local tomato season is definitely coming to an end.  Ellwood is winding down and local Roma tomatoes are starting to wrap up.

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Fuyu and Hachiya Persimmons Eat Differently

Have you ever tried a persimmon and thought you didn’t like it? Hachiyas and Fuyus are the two main commercial varieties of persimmons in the United States and are eaten very differently.  Hachiyas are tapered and shaped like an acorn. If you accidentally tried a piece of Hachiya before it was completely jelly soft, the astringency and bitterness would leave a fuzzy taste in your mouth. Hachiyas need to be fully ripened until they are almost translucent and EXTREMELY soft. If you think any part of the fruit is still firm you need to wait. Cut a ripe Hachiya in half and scoop out the delicious fruit or use the pulp in cakes, cookies and muffins.

Fuyu’s are short, squat and non-astringent and when ripe they have a sweet flavor with a hint of cinnamon and apricot.   You can eat them raw when they are firm or soft and they do not need to be peeled.  Fuyu’s can be eaten like an apple, cut up and eaten on their own or great in a salad.  You may sometimes find a few seeds inside but they are easy to eat around. Try making a Fuyu persimmon salad with cumin-lime vinaigrette or James Beard’s persimmon bread with Hachiya persimmons. 

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Fuyu Persimmons

The harvest usually starts around the beginning of October and goes through December. It can extend into January if there is no winter freeze.  California grows almost 100% of the persimmon crop in the United States followed by Florida, Texas, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Missouri. In California over half of the persimmons are grown in Tulare and Fresno counties.  The other main areas are Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties and a very small amount are grown in Sutter and Placer counties north of Sacramento.

Persimmons unlike many fruits will keep longer if left at room temperature.  Once they are in the refrigerator they will go soft faster and will need to be eaten quickly. Look for persimmons with smooth skin and no bruising. Persimmons are an excellent source of Vitamin A, C and fiber and full of antioxidants.

Cool fact: The light colored, fine-grained wood from a persimmon tree is used to make billard cues, drum sticks, golf clubs and furniture.

If you have never tried a persimmon this is the year to be adventurous and pick one up at the store. Try these easy recipes. 

 

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